draft

 

Full information is available on the conference website: http://cleurope.eu/CLE2017

All queries should be addressed to: CLE2017@ibl.waw.pl

Electronic version of the programme: http://cleurope.eu/CLE2017/programme/

 

 

Pre-conference workshops overview

Conference sessions overview

Keynotes

Events

Pre-Conference Workshops

Detailed Agenda 

DAY 1

DAY 2

DAY3 17

Pre-conference workshops overview

 

Workshops are free and open to public but you need to register here.

 

DAY 0

TUESDAY, 9 MAY

ROOM 144

11:00 DARIAH Survey on Digital Needs and Practices in the Arts and Humanities

Host: DARIAH Digital Methods and Practices Observatory Working Group (DiMPO) members (Costis Dallas – chair, Nephelie Chatzidiakou, Claire Clivaz, Koraljka Kuzman Šlogar, Maciej Maryl, Gerlinde Schneider, Tanja Wissik, Ingrida Vosyliute)

11:15
11:30
11:45
12:00
12:15
12:30 Coffee
12:45
13:00 Empirical Literary Studies: How to Handle Quantitative Data?

Host: prof. Willie van Peer (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)

13:15
13:30
13:45
14:00
14:15
14:30
14:45
15:00
15:15
15:30
15:45
16:00 Coffee
16:15
16:30 COST – Cooperation in Science and Technology: How to Prepare a Successful Proposal

Host: Rossella Magli, Science Officer at COST Association

16:45
17:00
17:15
17:30
17:45

 

 


Conference sessions overview

DAY 1

WEDNESDAY, 10 MAY

DAY2

THURSDAY, 11 MAY

DAY 3

FRIDAY, 12 MAY

9:00 OPENING

room 144

PS3A: Affect & Empathy

room 144

PS3B: Exile

room 268

PS6: Representations of Mobility

room 144

SIG3: Cultural Literacy in Higher Education

room 268

9:15
9:30 K1: Espen Aarseth

room 144

9:45
10:00
10:15
10:30 Coffee 1

E1: Wozu Poesie exhibition launch

10:45 Coffee 3
11:00 PS1A: Mediascape

room 144

PS1B: Translation

room 268

11:15 K3: Willie van Peer

room 144

Coffee 5
11:30
11:45 K4: Roma Sendyka & Erica Lehrer

room 144

12:00
12:15 E4: CLE Lunch

@ room 132

followed by

Annual General Meeting

@ room 144

12:30
12:45 Lunch break
13:00
13:15 Lunch break

E2: Why submitting a proposal to COST?

room 144

13:30
13:45 PS4: Readers

room 144

SIG1: Intersemiotic Translation and Cultural Literacy

room 268

PS7A: Representations of Migration

room 144

PS7B: Spaces

room 268

14:00
14:15 K2: Isabel Capeloa Gil

room 144

14:30
14:45
15:00
15:15 Coffee2
15:30
15:45 PS2: Education

room 144

16:00 Coffee 4 CLOSING

room 144

16:15
16:30 PS5: Representations of Memory

room 154

SIG2: Cultural Literacy and Creative Futures: Theory and Practice

room 268

16:45
17:00 CLE Core Group

closed meeting

room 144

17:15
17:30
17:45
18:00
18:15
18:30
18:45
19:00
19:15
19:30   E5: Dinner

Solec 44

19:45
20:00 E3: Art Event: Aura Rosenberg. Angel of  History @ Galeria Studio &

De Gruyter Opening Reception

20:15
20:30
20:45
K – Keynote; PS – Paper Session; SIG – CLE Special Interest Group; E – Event; Coffee – self-explanatory

 

Keynotes

K1: Espen Aarseth, The complex cultural objects and practices we for some reason call games

The talk will present a perspective on computer and video games as a gateway to global cultures and emergent textualities. Games offer new forms of virtual tourism,  where our new generations explore and enact historical, contemporary, and futuristic geographical scenarios. Literature (but not necessarily storytelling) has until recent times been the foremost vehicle for such cultural dissemination, so are computer games a new and perhaps even dominant form of literature?

 

Espen Aarseth is Assistant Professor and Head of Research at the Center for Computer Games Research and director for the Games Program here at the IT University of Copenhagen. Editor-in-Chief of Game Studies. His research concerns ideological, narrative, semiotic and ontological aspects of games and game communication, as well as topics such as game addiction, games and meaning, and also digital literature culture and aesthetics.

K2: Isabel Capeloa Gil, Emotional Necropolitics from Antigone to bin Laden

Burials are unquestionably rituals where private passions and public zones of intimacy come together, where private memorialization scenes interact with the organization of public sentiment, where affect is effectively ushered into the promotion of socially organized mourning practices. The talk looks at the cultural impact of burial denial on the affective experience of those other bodies who interact with the dead, the logistics of affect that organize or are organized by the social structure of feeling and the ways in which they promote a pedagogic or resistant affectivity.  By addressing two representative case studies, Sophocles’ Antigone and the bin Laden affair, I wish to probe the manifold ways in which burial affects effectively matter. At stake are issues such as the governamentalization of the organic, the modalization of mourning, the mode of affect production and its interaction with the public technologies of affect. The production of an emotional necropolitics around the non-existing burial has social-political implications, negotiates cultural memory practices and articulates non-intentional modes of experience in their dealings with dominant ‘machinic assemblages’ of power (Grossberg). Of particular interest in this regard is the articulation of  affective investment with erasure and the questioning of the role of aesthetics in the grey zone where burial  prohibition is placed.

 

Isabel Capeloa Gil is Associate Professor of Cultural Theory at the Catholic University of Portugal and Honorary Fellow at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies (U. London). She is currently the Vice-Rector of the Catholic University of Portugal and the Director of the postgraduate program The Lisbon Consortium. Her main research areas include intermedia studies, gender studies as well as representations of war and conflict.

K3: Willie van Peer, What Literature Does to Us. And How Do We Know?

Most of our responses to literature center around ideas and emotions. But it is the concrete form in which literature presents these that makes it so special. To unravel the secrets of such literary effects, we need the best possible methods to study the responses of readers. These methods exist and they are available to anyone interested in the study of literature. They are, however, sadly underemployed by literary scholars, resulting in our poor knowledge of how emotions function in reading.

The lecture will present clear examples of these methods, illustrating the spectacular results they have yielded. Not only do they reveal solid insights into the interaction of cognitive and emotional processes of reading. More importantly even, they also unveil hitherto unexpected aspects of the interplay between the form and content of literary texts.

 

Willie van Peer is Professor of Literary Studies and Intercultural Hermeneutics at the University of Munich, former President of IGEL (International Association for the Empirical Study of Literature and Media) and of PALA (Poetics and Linguistics Association). He is the author of several books and many articles on poetics and the epistemological foundations of literary studies, including Stylistics and Psychology: Investigations of Foregrounding (London, 1986).

K4: Roma Sendyka & Erica Lehrer, ‘Awkward Objects of Genocide’: Reading and Curating Affect with Pluralist Cultural Literacies

This talk is based on preliminary findings of the team research project Awkward objects of genocide: vernacular arts of [Holocaust] witness in and beyond Polish ethnographic museums, developed within the project Transmitting Contentious Cultural Heritages with the Arts: From Intervention to Co-Production (TRACES, Horizon 2020, Reflective Society, 2016-2019). We focus on vernacular art objects produced since 1945 in Poland documenting the Nazi Occupation. These objects provide a laboratory for observing entanglements of culture, emotion, and memory/forgetting regarding the murder of Poland’s Jews during the Holocaust. We illustrate how these analytically challenging objects hover betwixt multiple symbolic systems (Polish/German,/Christian/Jewish; “folk”/elite; vernacular/popular/high arts), and describe our plans for curating them in participatory ways with multiple taxonomies that highlight their complexity and open them to (and beyond) their entangled “heritage communities.”  The talk will be illustrated by Wojciech Wilczyk’s photos and comments by Magdalena Zych (participants of TRACES).

 

Roma Sendyka  is Director of the Research Center for Memory Cultures, teaches at the Center for Anthropology of Literature and Cultural Studies at the Polish Studies Department, Jagiellonian University, Krakow. Founder of the Curatorial Collective.  Specializes in criticism and theory,  visual culture studies, and memory studies. Focuses on relations between images, sites and memory, currently working on a project on non-sites of memory in Central and Eastern Europe.

Erica Lehrer is a socio‑cultural anthropologist and curator. She is currently Associate Professor in the departments of History and Sociology‑Anthropology and Canada Research Chair in Museum & Heritage Studies at Concordia University, Montreal. She is the author of Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places (Indiana University Press 2013). In 2013 she curated the exhibit Souvenir, Talisman, Toy and in 2014 published the accompanying book Lucky Jews and the online exhibit.

 

 

 

Events

E1: Wozu Poesie / What’s the Point of Poetry? A European Polyphony. On Show

Day 1, 10:30 coffee room – virtual exhibition launch with Madeleine Campbell. The exhibition at the coffee space will be available throughout the conference.

 

Poets constantly find themselves confronted by the question – ‘What’s the point of poetry?’ and having to justify what they do. The exhibition explores that question and tries to find fundamental answers for each country individually by collecting the viewpoints of these 39 poets from as many countries in Europe. It documents the ways in which poets assess the state of culture and society in their countries, also providing an answer to the question – what does poetry communicate, what messages and demands do the poets involved have for their societies, and what does the idea of ‘home’ mean to each of them? The answers are at the same time a demonstration and an act of solidarity. The project was aimed at provoking a wide-ranging international discussion to be conducted in every country, in every society. The opening was at the poesiefestival berlin. The initiator, Sergey Shabohin (born in Minsk in 1984) is an artist and curator, and is co-founder and chief editor of www.artaktivist.org art portal for modern Belarusian art.

First held in Berlin in 2013, this exhibition will be hosted by (e)motion, CLE’s Second Biennial Conference, Warsaw 10-12 May 2017, with thanks to Haus für Poesie, Berlin. See also SIG1.

E2: Why submit a proposal to COST?

Day 1, 13:15 room 144 –  lunch break with Rossella Magli, Science Officer at COST Association.

 

COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) offers funding for international cooperation and networking in all areas of research. The session will provide some background on the framework and will try to highlight the main challenges, benefits and possible outcomes that successful proposals could expect, with a specific focus on Social Sciences and Humanities.

 

E3: Aura Rosenberg. Angel of History & De Gruyter Opening Reception

Day 1, 20:00, Galeria Studio, pl. Defilad 1 (Palace of Culture and Science).

Opening reception (courtesy of De Gruyter) and exhibition show with introduction by Dorota Jarecka (Director of Galeria Studio)

NOTE: The organisers will depart from Staszic Palace main entrance at 19:30, so you can either join us, or meet us at the gallery.

 

Angel of History is the first solo show in Poland by Aura Rosenberg, an American artist living and working in New York and Berlin. It follows a central theme in her work: private histories embedded in world history. The exhibition includes photographs, sculptural installations and films, which interpret Walter Benjamin’s writings. Angel of History is a long-term ongoing project that includes an animated film (2013), a series of black/white prints Black Noise (2008), and a series of prints from the front page of The New York Times. In a form that plays with camp and kitsch and evokes computer games, the film proposes an interpretation of Benjamin’s well known allegory of “the angel of history”. In the photo series Berlin Childhood, shot entirely in Berlin, Rosenberg found that the daily routine of raising her daughter Carmen brought her in contact with the spaces and experiences Benjamin describes in his chronicle Berlin Childhood around 1900. Unexpectedly, this coincided with the history of her own family, which fled Germany in 1939. Her goal became to produce photos to match each entry in Benjamin’s book. What emerged was a retrospective look into the origins of modernity through the lens of contemporary Berlin.

Curator: Barbara Piwowarska

Full description available here (scroll down for English).

 

E4: CLE Lunch & Annual General Meeting

Day 2, 12:15 – sandwiches at the coffee room followed by the CLE Forum general meeting at room 144 at 12:45.

Grab some sandwiches (courtesy of Cultural Literacy in Europe Forum) and join us in the session about CLE. The aim of the meeting is to present the work and aims of the Forum and discuss the ways of getting involved with the initiative. There will be brief presentations from the chair and the special interest groups, a description of CLE’s membership system and nominations will be sought for two new members of the CLE’s executive body: an Early Career Research (ECR) and a membership secretary.

 

E5: Social dinner

Day 2, 19:30 – Solec 44.

Networking dinner open to all participants. The relaxing atmosphere of Solec 44, together with gourmet dishes, will provide relaxation after the long day of hard work and constitute a setting for informal discussions.

NOTE: The organisers will depart from Staszic Palace main entrance at 19:00, so you can either join us, or meet us at the venue.


 

Pre-Conference Workshops

TUESDAY, 9 MAY  | ROOM 144

Workshops are free and open to public but you need to register here.

1: (11:00-12:30) DARIAH Survey on Digital Needs and Practices in the Arts and Humanities

Host: DARIAH Digital Methods and Practices Observatory Working Group (DiMPO) members (Costis Dallas – chair, Nephelie Chatzidiakou, Claire Clivaz, Koraljka Kuzman Šlogar, Maciej Maryl, Gerlinde Schneider, Tanja Wissik, Ingrida Vosyliute)

Presentation of the results of the European survey on scholarly practices and digital needs in the arts and humanities which is the outcome of collaborative work of European researchers from different countries, working within the Digital Methods and Practices Observatory Working Group (DiMPO), Working Group of DARIAH-ERIC. It has been designed as a multiregional longitudinal survey, to be conducted online across European countries and to be repeated every few years. Its aim is to provide an evidence-based outlook of scholarly practices, needs and attitudes of European humanities researchers towards digital resources, methods and tools across space and time. Results of the first run of the survey (completed in March 2015) will be presented along with some interesting data from particular countries. Plans for the new run of the survey will be discussed with the audience.

 

2: (13:00-16:00) Empirical Literary Studies: How to Handle Quantitative Data?

Host: prof. Willie van Peer (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)

Central to any scientific investigation is the collection of independent data – to be held against the predictions of a theory. But what do you do after you have collected the data? Many scholars in literary studies are then baffled by the amount of information they have acquired. And often they are lost: what to do now, apart from calculating percentages? How to extract the information you are after?

This workshop will introduce you to the basics of getting the information you need out of your data. This will be done with the help of the computer program SPSS (available in a provisional form from the internet). This will be a hands-on workshop! Participants are requested to bring their own laptops with a version of SPSS installed on it (note that a 14-day trial version is available online. Be sure to install it not earlier than 2 weeks before the workshop). We will work with real data at the computer, so that you can yourself learn immediately how to explore your data.

 

3: (16:30 -18:00) COST – Cooperation in Science and Technology: How to Prepare a Successful Proposal

Host: Rossella Magli, Science Officer at COST Association

COST is an intergovernmental organisation supporting the collaboration of researchers through networks, called “Actions”. These are pan-European networks of researchers and scientists, open to all fields of S&T, lasting four years. The workshop will provide an introduction on the COST framework and will guide the participants on how to prepare a successful proposal, with a particular view on Social Sciences and Humanities, playing “alone” or in synergy with other scientific fields. The presentation will be followed by an interactive Q&A session, in which all tips and tricks to increase the chances of success will be discussed.

 


CLE SIGs: Workshops Organised by Special Interest Groups
THURSDAY-FRIDAY | ROOM 268

One of the CLE project planned actions was to set up and run special interest groups devoted to key areas and initiatives. The idea behind the workshops is to share the work of SIGs and invite new collaborators, interested in researching particular topics.

Workhsops are open to all conference participants.

 

 

SIG1: Intersemiotic Translation and Cultural Literacy

Day 2, 13:45 | Wozu Image (what’s the point of images/wherefore images)

Hosts: Madeleine Campbell and Laura González

 

This two-hour workshop seeks to expand the themes of the Wozu Poesie exhibition through intersemiotic translation and its body experience. The workshop will explore the relation between image and text, and what it means to put oneself in the picture. We will consider tableaux vivants, self-portraits, and artivism as methods to continue the series of images in the exhibition, paying attention to decision making, gesture, voice, and frame. Apart from a reading of Wozu Poesie images, we will introduce you to other artists working on the relation between text and image, such as Gillian Wearing and La Ribot. We will hope, by the end of the workshop, to provide some personal answers to the question ‘what is the point of images?’

Participants are asked to see as much the exhibition as possible and to bring a red item into the workshop. If you have access to a mobile phone with a camera and writing materials (pens, pencils, markers), you should also bring those.

 

SIG2: Cultural Literacy and Creative Futures: Theory and Practice

Day 2, 16:00 | Cultural Literacy and Social Futures

Hosts: Robert Crawshaw, Joanna Kosmalska, Andrea Nixon, Emily Spiers

 

The objective of this panel will be to present the work programme of the SIG ‘Cultural Literacy and Social Futures’ (CLSF).  The programme will involve a series of five workshops over two years run by a network of six universities: Lancaster, Kings London, Bath Spa, Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, University of Łódź, the Institut National des Langues et Cultures Orientales, Paris and a major International Gallery, Tate Liverpool. The programme’s objective is to promote cooperation between researchers and practitioners already engaged in the integration of cultural practice and social life in different areas of the arts:  writing, filmmaking, music and performance and exhibition.  An extended network of collaboration has been established with cultural agencies and creative practitioners in four different centres in the UK and with schools in those areas.  The panel will consist of an introduction to the CLSF project followed by four brief presentations by the individual regional coordinators, supported by recordings of live performance, film extracts, readings and images.  These will lead on to a more general discussion of the way in which creative artefacts can best be integrated into educational curricula and their form and generation better understood as objects of research in terms of their relationship with their social environment.

 

 

SIG3: Cultural Literacy in Higher Education

Day 3, 9:00 | Embedding Cultural Literacy in Higher Education

Hosts: Gabriel García Ochoa, Sarah McDonald

How do we embed Cultural Literacy in the Higher Education curriculum across different disciplines and cultural backgrounds? The aim of this workshop is to share with our colleagues a suite of strategies to teach Cultural Literacy to Higher Education students.
The teaching strategies that we propose approach culture as a readable, text-like artefact. They challenge ethnocentric ideas of culture (where disciplinary fields are also seen as cultures). We would like to invite our colleagues to consider incorporating these strategies into their own teaching practice.

In 2015, during the first Cultural Literacy Conference in London, we trialled a pilot
workshop that explored “destabilisation” and “reflection” as teaching strategies.
The purpose of destabilisation is to prompt a conceptual shift in students that will unsettle their views on a given topic. This allows students to understand how they approach, both conceptually and empirically, what they do not know, and how they react to the uncertainty of new situations. In order to draw meaning out of this experience, destabilization must be followed by a process of reflection where students learn to apply a variety of skills that are inherent to LCS, such as comparative analysis, collation, research, rephrasing, cultural and linguistic translation, etc.

Through “hands on” exercises, this new workshop will explore different examples of “destabilisation” and “reflection” that we have trialled in the classroom (both successfully and unsuccessfully), and will discuss the new teaching strategies for CL across disciplinary fields that we have developed over the last two years.

 

 

Detailed Agenda

DAY 1

08:30

Registration

09:00

Opening

09:30

K1

Keynote

Espen Aarseth IT University of Copenhagen The Complex Cultural Objects and Practices We for Some Reason Call Games

10:30

Coffee1

10:30

E1

Wozu Poesie exhibition launch

11:00

PS1A

Mediascape

Marek Zaleski Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Mediascape’s Drifter
Grzegorz Zyzik University of Opole Corona Australis and the Sisters. Poetry as the source of world-building in Tension
Jerzy Stachowicz University of Warsaw Digitally assisted conversation  – smartphones, Google and change of literacy practices
Tomasz Umerle Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Fluid Borders of ‘Literature’: Literary Theory versus the Practice of Literary Documentation
Krzysztof Gajewski Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Knowledge in Motion. Problems of Analysis of Quality and Authorship of Polish Wikipedia Articles on Literature and Literary Studies

11:00

PS1B

Translation

Claire Clivaz Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne Migrations and translations of the expression ‘Digital Humanities’
Ricarda Vidal and Manuela Perteghella King’s College London / independent Translation as movement: migration and notions of ‘home’
Heather Connelly Birmingham City University Translation Zones: Linguistic Hospitality
Gabriel Borowski Jagiellonian University, Kraków Self as translation: (e)motional identity strategies in contemporary Brazilian fiction

13:15

Lunch1

13:15

E2

Why submit a proposal to COST?

14:15

K2

Keynote

Isabel Capeloa Gil Catholic University of Portugal Emotional Necropolitics from Antigone to bin Laden

15:15

Coffee2

15:45

PS2

Education

Arlene Holmes-Henderson University of Oxford Learning lessons from the past: cultivating cultural literacy through Classics
Katrina Roszynski University of Stirling Ac{knowledge}ing difficulty: Bildung, raznorečie and learning journeys
Arkadiusz Półtorak Jagiellonian University, Kraków Handbooks for City Dwellers. Addressing Migrant Subjectivities in Contemporary Art

20:00

E3

Aura Rosenberg. Angel of  History @ Galeria Studio

&

De Gruyter Opening Reception


 

DAY2

09:00

PS3A

Affect & Empathy

Robert Crawshaw Lancaster University Affect Theory and its discontents
Agnieszka Dauksza Jagiellonian University, Kraków Affective diffusion between migrants and local communities. Case of Lampedusa Island
Wojciech Małecki University of Wrocław Entangled Empathy, Animal Narratives, and Moral Mobility
Naomi Segal Birkbeck, University of London Familial (e)motion: the drama of the replacement child

09:00

PS3B

Exile

Doris Mironescu Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași Exile Writers and the Sense of Space: Norman Manea, Herta Müller and Andrei Codrescu
Teodor Ajder Editor contributor, “Mămăliga de Varșovia” Authority and Emancipation Within Facebook Romanian Diasporic Groups
Jolanta Budriūnienė Lithuanian University of  Educational Sciences, Vilnius Lithuanian Diaspora Press in English – historical aspect
Ewa Kołodziejczyk Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Czesław Miłosz’s Migrant Perspective in “Native Realm”

10:45

Coffee3

11:15

K3

Keynote

Willie van Peer Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich What Literature Does to Us. And How Do We Know?

12:15

E4

CLE Lunch & Annual General Meeting

13:45

PS4

Readers

Anna Chesnokova, Sonia Zyngier, Vander Viana, Fernanda Ribeiro, Juliana Jandre and Anna Rumbesht Borys Grinchenko Kyiv University / Federal University of Rio de Janeiro / University of Stirling / Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro Emotion and cultural responses to a poem: Looking through translations in three different languages
Jiří Trávníček Institute of Czech Literature, Czech Academy of Sciences Reading life-stories
Simone Rebora Georg-August-Universität Göttingen Fantasy in Motion: from ‘Secondary Worlds’ to Reality
Bogdan Balicki University of Szczecin Cognition of reader
Maciej Maryl Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Cherchez Les Lecteurs! Towards an Integrated Model of Empirical Research into Cultural Literacy

13:45

SIG1

Intersemiotic Translation and Cultural Literacy

16:00

Coffee4

16:30

PS5

Representations of Memory

Mary Gallagher University College Dublin Re-reading ‘Home’: Two Haitian Narratives of Return
Katarzyna Kwapisz Williams Australian National University, Canberra Europe from afar: migration, memory and the construction of a cosmopolitan self
Iuliia Lashchuk University of Warsaw Migrated art and reconstruction of the memory. Ukrainian Artists form Crimea and Donbas
Dorota Jarecka Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Is this a pilgrimage? New Peredvishniki, or artists on the move

16:30

SIG2

Cultural Literacy and Creative Futures: Theory and Practice

19:30

E5

Dinner @ Solec 44


DAY3

09:00

PS6

Representations of Mobility

Dana Badulescu Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași Ian McEwan’s Parable of Reading in “Black Dogs”
Joanna Maj University of Wrocław Polish and German Literary Tourist Guides as a Form of Literary History
Jean Owen writer Immigration, Incest and Post-nationality in Krys Lee’s “The Believer”
Nagihan Haliloğlu Ibn Khaldun University, Istanbul Mobility and Nausea in Michel Houellebecq’s “The Possibility of an Island”
Jurate Radaviciute Vilnius University The violence underlying the process of movement in Salman Rushdie’s novel “Shame”

09:00

SIG3

Cultural Literacy in Higher Education

11:15

Coffee5

11:45

K4

Keynote

Roma Sendyka Jagiellonian University, Kraków ‘Awkward Objects of Genocide’: Reading and Curating Affect with Pluralist Cultural Literacies
Erica Lehrer Concordia University, Montreal

12:45

Lunch3

13:45

PS7A

Representations of Migration

Justyna Tabaszewska Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Small-Scale Migration and Ordinary Affects. Polish Experience of Small-Scale Migrations and Their Literary Representation
Simon Lang Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Italian work immigrants in German and Italian fiction film
Paweł Mościcki Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Migrant Images. Refugees between Pathos and Montage
Katarzyna Kociołek University of Warsaw Metaphors of Mobility in British Fashion
Laura González Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Embodying hysteria as caring for the self

13:45

PS7B

Spaces

Anna Barcz Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences Moving Rivers: Vulnerability and Resilience in Aquacritical Literature
Deniz Balık Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir Memory of Things: A Hermeneutic Reading of Sampling in Architecture
Victor Chesnokov and Irina Kats Borys Grinchenko Kyiv University / Manchester University Migration and cultural changes in the city: challenges of the 21 century
Claire Lozier University of Leeds The politics of (e)motions:  affect and movement in Michel Houellebecq
Oksana Golovashina G.R. Derzhavin Tambov State University Homo traveling or identificational risks of consumption of the past

16:00

Closing